Category Archives: Experience Design

What’s in a name?

croppedimage540333-Naming

A good pragmatist look at nameing organisations – the logic and process from Wellington design firm DNA:

Creativity, clarity on the brief and objectives count with naming of course, but the process of selecting in order to protect and execute a name matters almost more.

We’ve found that there are often two lists, names you love, and names you can actually execute. Creating a list is relatively easy, getting a name you can use (protect) is often the hardest part.

Naming is a critical component in building a successful brand/service/experience. Following a well proven process and methodology will ensure delivery of a unique, relevant and realisable name – be it for a product, service, company or place.

Naming as a process is about having defined, ordered and robust logic behind what the consumer will experience. A name is only ever part of a brand, but its often where the process starts. Consequently, naming development relies on reaching agreement on a criteria for decision making, in order to ensure you get a result.

In addition there are types or groups of names; the most common are literal or descriptive names, which we believe are the most potent types to consider first off when developing product/brand strategy and naming. The first step in any naming exercise (be it evaluation or development) is to define which of these directions or types will best suit the project at hand.

Read the full article on the DNA website

Paula Scher: Do What You’ve Never Done Before

Sometimes you have to ignore the brief, says renowned designer and artist Paula Scher. With a dry wit, Scher takes us behind-the-scenes on four landmark projects — from revamping MoMA’s identity to reinvigorating a Pittsburgh neighborhood through design — to illustrate how asking questions, pushing into uncharted territory, and doing something you’ve never done before leads to great work.

UCLA’s Augmented Reality Sandbox


The Augmented Reality Sandbox allows students and the public to interact with a miniature landscape, sculpting mountains, valleys, rivers and even volcanoes, with off the shelf readily available parts.

Topographic maps are crucial tools used by geologists, geographers and adventurous hikers. A newly-built apparatus at UCLA makes topographic maps fun and interactive for everyone by projecting them in 3D.

Fossil Hunters of the Gobi: A 360 Scientific Expedition

Join a 1920s paleontology expedition to the Gobi Desert with Roy Chapman Andrews, then visit modern-day museum collections with paleontologist Mike Novacek to discover how these finds are studied today.

This 360 video is part of Shelf Life’s second season, exploring fantastic stories from far-away places where some of the American Museum of Natural History’s 33 million specimens and artifacts were discovered. The series links those collection items and epic adventures of the past with current scientific inquiry.

Popular versus Brilliant (Jim Bull at Designers + Geeks)

Best bits to watch [6:30-22:00]

Jim Bull is worried about the future of design and thinks you should be too. Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of Moving Brands, Jim dissects an industry where design is judged by the number of its likes and shares, where the focus is on efficiency rather than brilliance, and where one or two companies set the design standard for the globe.

Field Trip to Mars – Group VR Experience

A group of kids in Washington, D.C., thought they were taking an ordinary school-bus ride to the USA Science and Engineering Festival recently. But much to their surprise, they suddenly took a detour—to Mars.

This was thanks to Lockheed Martin, which created, with help from McCann and Framestore, the Lockheed Martin Mars Experience Bus, in which the windows of a bus were turned into screens and a “group VR” experience made the pint-size riders feel like they were traveling around the surface of the Red Planet.

The video below shows the stunt in action, and it’s clear the kids were thrilled to have made a journey to a neighboring planet in seconds that normally takes the fastest spacecraft several months.

Caress of the Gaze

Caress of the Gaze from Pier 9 on Vimeo.

What if our outfit could recognise and respond to the gaze of the other? This is an interactive 3D printed wearable which can detect other people’s gaze and respond accordingly with life-like behaviour.

Created by Behnaz Farahi – (behnazfarahi.com/)

Work produced as part of the Pier 9 Artist in Residence program (autodesk.com/air)
More Pier 9 videos here – vimeopro.com/pier9/workshop/

Editor – Charlie Nordstrom

Cinematography – Elena Kulikova & Charlie Nordstrom