Category Archives: Experience Design

Meet Braille Bricks | #BrailleBricksForAll

Braille Bricks is a toy for literacy and inclusion of blind children.

The standard Lego brick has six dots, arranged in two columns of three–the exact same configuration of braille lettering.

It’s one of those coincidences that feels almost fated in retrospect. Which is why in a pro bono project for the Dorina Nowill Foundation–a nonprofit that offers free services to families with vision impairment–the marketing firm Lew’Lara\TBWA came up with an ingenious mashup: Braille Bricks.

Share #BrailleBricksForAll to convince toy manufactures to produce this beautiful project for children around the world.

Read more on www.fastcodesign.com

How Pokémon Go Cracked the Augmented Reality Code

Three years ago, everyone thought Google Glass was going to be the future of augmented reality. But by 2015, Glass had been pulled from the market and deemed a failure. Turns out, people didn’t really want AR in their glasses—they wanted it to help them catch Pokémon on their phones.

Image Via Statista

Read full article on Contently.com

What’s in a name?

croppedimage540333-Naming

A good pragmatist look at nameing organisations – the logic and process from Wellington design firm DNA:

Creativity, clarity on the brief and objectives count with naming of course, but the process of selecting in order to protect and execute a name matters almost more.

We’ve found that there are often two lists, names you love, and names you can actually execute. Creating a list is relatively easy, getting a name you can use (protect) is often the hardest part.

Naming is a critical component in building a successful brand/service/experience. Following a well proven process and methodology will ensure delivery of a unique, relevant and realisable name – be it for a product, service, company or place.

Naming as a process is about having defined, ordered and robust logic behind what the consumer will experience. A name is only ever part of a brand, but its often where the process starts. Consequently, naming development relies on reaching agreement on a criteria for decision making, in order to ensure you get a result.

In addition there are types or groups of names; the most common are literal or descriptive names, which we believe are the most potent types to consider first off when developing product/brand strategy and naming. The first step in any naming exercise (be it evaluation or development) is to define which of these directions or types will best suit the project at hand.

Read the full article on the DNA website

Paula Scher: Do What You’ve Never Done Before

Sometimes you have to ignore the brief, says renowned designer and artist Paula Scher. With a dry wit, Scher takes us behind-the-scenes on four landmark projects — from revamping MoMA’s identity to reinvigorating a Pittsburgh neighborhood through design — to illustrate how asking questions, pushing into uncharted territory, and doing something you’ve never done before leads to great work.