Category Archives: Interactive

Vanishing Mesh Instillation

The Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media [YCAM] presents Vanishing Mesh exhibition, a new installation work by two groups of artists, So Kanno + yang02 and The SINE WAVE ORCHESTRA.

Vanishing Mesh is an expression that hints at the various boundaries and other defining lines that are gradually becoming invisible due to technological innovation. This exhibition is an attempt to review present informational environments through the innovation of technology-based art in a ubiquitous society. Thanks to the popularization of smartphones or smart mobile devices, it enables us to communicate through the networks wherever we are.

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Mixed Reality – THEORIZ – RnD test 002

From French company Theoriz

“Second test of our currently in research and development technology for audiovisual production, using in house tracking system (Augmenta) and Vive VR tracking technologies with real time video and projection mapping in space.

There is no post-production on this video.”

http://www.theoriz.com/

UCLA’s Augmented Reality Sandbox


The Augmented Reality Sandbox allows students and the public to interact with a miniature landscape, sculpting mountains, valleys, rivers and even volcanoes, with off the shelf readily available parts.

Topographic maps are crucial tools used by geologists, geographers and adventurous hikers. A newly-built apparatus at UCLA makes topographic maps fun and interactive for everyone by projecting them in 3D.

Paraplegics are learning to walk again with virtual reality

vr

Watch the video

From www.qz.com

The chances of recovery for paraplegic patients were once considered nearly nil. But in 2014, 29-year-old Juliano Pinto, who faced complete paralysis below the chest, literally kicked off the opening match at the FIFA World Cup. Researchers had created a brain-machine interface (BMI) that allowed Pinto to control a robotic exoskeleton for the symbolic kickoff at São Paulo’s Corinthians Arena.

Fast forward two years, the Walk Again Project (WAP), the same nonprofit international research consortium that designed Pinto’s exoskeleton, is now using virtual reality to help paraplegic people regain partial sensation and muscle control in their lower limbs. According to a study published Aug. 11 in Scientific Reports, all eight patients who participated in the study have already gained some motor control.

“When we look at the brains of these patients when they got to us, we couldn’t detect any signal when we asked them to imagine walking again. There was no modulation of brain activity,” Dr. Miguel Nicolelis, the lead researcher from Duke University in North Carolina, said in a Scientific Reports call on Aug. 9. “It’s almost like the brain had erased the concept of moving by walking.”

To regain movement, patients were first placed in virtual reality environment, where they learned to use brain activity to control an avatar version of themselves and make it walk around a soccer field. Researchers used Oculus Rift, which is available for purchase off the shelves. They also designed a long sleeve T-shirt which would provide haptic feedback to the patients’ forearms, stimulating the sensation of touching the ground. The arms were treated as phantom limbs, substituting for the legs, fooling the brain into feeling like the patient was walking.

After the brain reacquired the notion of walking, each patient graduated to a custom-designed exoskeleton. The exoskeleton uses a cap with nodes on the wearer’s head, which picks up signals and relays them to a computer in the exoskeleton’s backpack. When the patient thinks about walking, the computer activates the exoskeleton.

By walking in the exoskeleton an hour a day, patients were eventually able to rekindle their remaining nerves to send signals back to brain, and reactivate some voluntary movement and sensitivity. Each patient had a different recovery period but all were able to feel sensation again in the pelvic region and lower limbs, and also learned to control some of their muscles, their bladder and bowel function for the first time in many years.

Read full story on www.qz.com

6 augmented reality apps that aren’t Pokemon GO

From Stuff

In a very short time, Pokemon GO has pushed augmented reality (AR) into the mainstream.

Its ability to overlay digital animations onto the real world using your phone’s camera and screen is unlike any other popular game before it. But Pokemon GO isn’t the only app that seamlessly blends virtual objects into the real world. Here are the best AR apps not linked with Nintendo.

Read full story >