Category Archives: Web

What If Smart Homes Were Designed For Seniors, Instead?

From www.fastcodesign.comYoung people are often the internet of things’ target market, but elders might make more sense, argues one designer.

The smart home of the future is designed for millennials: tech-savvy, hyper-social, Marie Kondo-reading youngsters who aspire to keep their lives clean and orderly forever. But life is messy, and technology is perhaps, ultimately, more life-improving to the old than to the young. What millennial, after all, needs a titanium hip, or a replacement heart?

So when Kevin Gaunt envisions the future of the smart home, he doesn’t think of it in terms of millennials, or their “picturesque Airbnb-style houses inhabited by attractive people who effortlessly interact with technology, dealing with all our chores and reading our deepest wishes before we are even aware of them.” Instead, he asks what the smart homes and conversational interfaces of the future can do for the elderly. And his answers seem a lot less empty than the thermostat-automating smart home bots of today.

 

From www.fastcodesign.com

 

Bots – Battling Boredom in Smart Homes from Kevin on Vimeo.

5 New Features Across Twitter, Facebook and Instagram That You Need to Know About

From www.socialmediatoday.com

One of the best things about covering social media and digital marketing is that there’s always something new happening, some new update or feature being rolled-out to cover. But some of them are relatively small-scale so they’re not necessarily worthy of their own, individual post – though they are still relevant and worth knowing for anyone working in the field.

To keep you up to date on these smaller changes and features, here’s a rundown of five upcoming or “in-test mode” features that are currently being trialled on some of the major platforms – starting with Twitter, which is testing some new customer service focused options.

1. New Twitter Profile Display Options

2. Twitter Sports Broadcasting

3. Facebook Video Downloads

4. Facebook Messenger Account Switching

5. Instagram Comment Moderation

Read about them on socialmediatoday.com

Interactive inspiration: Jonathan Harris

jason ohara

Screen Shot 2016-07-06 at 4.26.50 pmJonathan Harris is an artist and computer scientist from Vermont.

I find his work very interesting but he regularly falls into the trap of the interface overpowering the content – something I specifically want to avoid. An example is the whale hunt interactive which is extremely clever but I prefer the highlights page from the same interactive

His work is in the permanent collection of The Museum of Modern Art, and has been exhibited at Le Centre Pompidou (Paris), the CAFA Art Museum (Beijing), the Barbican Center (London), the Victora and Albert Museum (London), and The Pace Gallery (New York). He studied computer science at Princeton University and spent a year in Italy at Fabrica. The winner of three Webby Awards, Print Magazine named him a “New Visual Artist,” and the World Economic Forum named him a “Young Global Leader.” His TED talks have been viewed millions of times.

His website: http://number27.org/

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#Trashtag

From the 2016 Interaction awards – a great example of digital interaction in a real environment and experience design.

Project Description

Navigating the social media landscape often means spending time with our personal devices instead of with each other. We use our fingertips to transmit bits and bytes across the world more readily than we use our bodies to transmit social energy across a room. Who, at some point, hasn’t wondered if this rushing stream of ephemeral posts is leading us toward an island of social isolation rather than a true community of friends?

As part of Elevate Atlanta 2014, a pop-up gallery curated by local arts organizations, we created #Trashtag, a tangible interface for social messaging. Inspired by the weeklong exhibition’s “Social City” theme, we filled a dumpster with more than a hundred illuminated, magnetic blocks inscribed with words and emoji and beckoned the public into the installation with a phrase: “LET’S TALK.” Everyone was invited to participate by arranging the blocks to create messages of their own on the container’s walls. Strangers laughed together as they discovered hidden phrases in the piles of discarded words, and they disrupted each other’s work, playfully fighting over coveted terms and symbols. For one week in downtown Atlanta, social media became something new—a collective act undertaken together in physical space.

But #Trashtag did more than just collect these messages—it amplified them far beyond the confines of the dumpster. With the push of an oversized button, people could have the container tweet on their behalf. @TrashTagATL acted as a mouthpiece for the public’s ideas and hopes.

By the end of Elevate, #Trashtag had tweeted more than 200 posts. The messages were surprising and inspiring, at times critical, funny, and profound—a perfect reflection of the diversity of the participants. The public also littered the social media landscape with tagged Instagram photos, Facebook posts, retweets, and direct messages of their own, spreading awareness of the installation itself and the Elevate exhibition at large.

The dumpster ultimately became a symbol of the disposability of modern messaging, a place where sentiments could be tossed out and discarded as quickly as the pieces could be salvaged to create something new. But perhaps most importantly, #Trashtag transformed the dumpster into a creative space that anyone, regardless of age or background, could use to speak to others. Experimenting with what social media could look like in a physical place, we reimagined “posting” as a tangible task, a public activity, and a collective, evolving performance. In other words, we made social media truly social.

Essay “Is technology changing storytelling?”

Do changes in technology demand a different approach in the craft of writing? Or do the best stories still come in classic form? Here’s a research insight by rodgezooi as a doubtful enthousiast, investigating the storytelling potentials of new platforms and the masterpieces of the future it will eventually lead to.

For links to the footage used in this essay check: justpaste.it/k3tb

Essay “Is technology changing storytelling?” from rodgezooi on Vimeo.