The literary map of London is just beautiful

From www.indy100.com via Fay

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This map is both a snapshot of London’s literary history and beautiful in its own right.

More than 250 novels were mined in order to make the Literary London Map, taken from the Literary London Art Collection.

It was created by graphic artist Dex in collaboration with interior designer Anna Burles.

Read more on www.indy100.com

Vimeo 360 launch

Nofilmschool.com met the team behind Vimeo’s latest filmmaker-friendly platform at SXSW.

They’ve been intrigued about Vimeo 360 since the announcement of its launch earlier this month, especially because of its promise to enable accessibility and monetization of 360° projects at the high quality that we’ve come to expect from the company.

Paula Scher: Do What You’ve Never Done Before

Sometimes you have to ignore the brief, says renowned designer and artist Paula Scher. With a dry wit, Scher takes us behind-the-scenes on four landmark projects — from revamping MoMA’s identity to reinvigorating a Pittsburgh neighborhood through design — to illustrate how asking questions, pushing into uncharted territory, and doing something you’ve never done before leads to great work.

The Making of John Mayer’s ‘Born & Raised’ Artwork

David A. Smith is a traditional sign-writer/designer specialising in high-quality ornamental hand-crafted reverse glass signs and decorative silvered and gilded mirrors. David recently produced a wonderful turn-of-the-century, trade-card styled album cover for popular American singer/songwriter John Mayer.

This film captures the ‘Behind The Scenes’ creation of the ‘Born & Raised’ and ‘Queen of California’ artwork, as well as 2 unique reverse glass panels, hand-crafted in England by David A. Smith.

Top 10 Tips: Bond cinematographer Roger Deakins

From BBC News:

Roger Deakins is the director of photography on films such as The Shawshank Redemption, A Beautiful Mind, No Country for Old Men, True Grit and Skyfall, the most successful British film ever.

He’s won more than 60 awards for his work, including three Baftas, and was last year presented with a lifetime achievement award by the American Society of Cinematographers.

When he isn’t working, he spends his time living in LA, but his heart belongs to Devon, where he was born. “I miss it every day,” he says.

Here are his top ten tips for becoming a successful cinematographer.

1. Get some life experience

A cinematographer visualises the film and is a director’s right hand on set. I studied photography and then went to the National Film School in England and got into the business that way, but there are all kinds of ways of getting in.

I think it is more important to experience the world, really. You can’t learn cinematography and you can’t copy it. The job is just your way of looking at the world. Maybe that sounds a bit pretentious, but I think life experience is always more important than technical knowledge.

2. Be picky

I’m picky about the sort of material I want to work with, always have been. But usually I’m drawn to scripts that are about characters, I don’t have a love of doing action movies.

It is really important to choose which projects you are going to work on carefully. You are going to be on a film for a long time. I’ve just come back from Australia working on Unbroken with Angelina Jolie, which she was directing.

It’s six months of time and investment, but very worthwhile. I enjoyed it completely, but it was a hard shoot. You work long hours, often you’re working six days a week and you are away from home. There are certain kinds of sacrifices you have to make.

 

Read the full story on BBC News >>